Read 100 Best Sellers books



The Kite Runner


The Kite Runner: Page 70


Unlimited reading from over 1 million ebooks

Even after Amir and his father flee to America, Amir
remains haunted by his cowardly actions and disloyalty. In part, it is these
demons and the sometimes impossible quest for forgiveness that bring him back
to his war-torn native land after it comes under Taliban rule. ("...I wondered if
that was how forgiveness budded, not with the fanfare of epiphany, but with pain
gathering its things, packing up, and slipping away unannounced in the middle of
the night.")




Some of the plot's turns and twists may be somewhat implausible, but
Hosseini has created characters that seem so real that one almost forgets that
The Kite Runner is a novel and not a memoir. At a time when Afghanistan has
been thrust into the forefront of America's collective consciousness ("people
sipping lattes at Starbucks were talking about the battle for Kunduz"), Hosseini
offers an honest, sometimes tragic, sometimes funny, but always heartfelt view
of a fascinating land. Perhaps the only true flaw in this extraordinary novel is
that it ends all too soon. --Gisele Toueg --This text refers to the Hardcover
edition.



From a reader: 3 of 5



Very Good then Very Predictable



The first 3/4 of The Kite Runner is spectacular � harrowing and exciting
at the same time. I felt deeply for the characters and sensed I understood them
well and fully. There are six extremely well-fleshed out characters, each complex
and with complex relationships to one another � due to family, politics and
personality. And it is a page-turner, the events captivating even in the midst of
multi-layered brutality.



The last section however, about 150 pages, is less interesting. The book
becomes predictable to the point of ridiculous coincidences; the characters lack
the depth of the first part; it becomes purely plot-driven, and a very major plot
flaw is overlooked. At this point it's a matter of waiting for the plot to unfold in
the ways it invariably must, given its now [ironically] Hollywood/American style.
At times, during this final quarter, the only surprising elements are its sugar-
sweet sentimentality. The reading slows down, and there was no more page
turning for me, but to get to the end. It would make a fine Ron Howard vehicle.




Overall, it's not terrible and much of it is quite good. But given the final
chunk, my opinion is that it's over-praised and its Hollywood-style plot devices
toward the end are unfortunately ill-suited to the material. And just to point out:
it's an accessible read, not "intellectual" (though I realize that comes out as an
insult.. .it is what it is, fast and easy reading even though the material is polical
and brutal).



Awards won by The Kite Runner



* San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year



* American Library Association Notable Book



* Entertainment Weekly Top Ten Fiction Pick of the Year



* Borders Orgininal Voices Award winner



* Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers book




* Amazon.com Summer 2003 Breakout Book



* Entertainment Weekly's Best Book 2003



* Book Sense Bestseller List Sensation



* ALEX AWARD 2004 - Ten adult books that will appeal to teen readers have
been selected to receive the 2004 Alex Awards. Titles were chosen by the Alex
Award Committee of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a
division of the American Library Association (ALA).




some Afghan Recipe URLs



http://www.afghana.com/Directories/Recipes.htm



http://www.tastycooking.com/afghanistan.html




AUTHOR INTERVIEWS



NPR The Kite Runner



BBC Video Interview with Khaled Hosseini



Newsline Interview with Khaled Hosseini



Dialogue with Khaled Hosseini



Following Amir - A Trip to Afghanistan in Which Life Imitates Art




Rambler Interview-- A Storyteller's Story: Khaled Hosseini and The Kite Runner



FOREIGN TERMS IN THE KITE RUNNER



Agha

Great lord; nobleman; commander; Mister





Ahesta boro



Wedding song. Literally Ahesta, slow; Boro, go



Ahmaq



Foolish, stupid, awkward; a greater or the greatest fool



A1 hamdullellah



Thanks to God



Alahoo



God



Alef-beh



The letters A (alef) and B (beh), used to signify the entire alphabet




Allah-u-akbar



God (is) greatest, omnipotent; (Arabic) Akbar means great and Allah
means God



Attan



A Pashtun tribal dance performed on festive occasions and as a physical
exercise in the army. It is performed to the ever-faster rhythm of drums, the
tribesmen's long hair whipping in unison, and is often continued to exhaustion.
In some respects it resembles the dance of the "whirling dervishes" of the
Ottoman empire. Although Pashtun in origin, it has also been adopted by other
ethnic groups as the Afghan national dance.



Aush



Afghan soup with noodles, meat, vegetables, tomato broth, and yogurt and
garnished with mint.



Awroussi



Wedding ceremony




Ayat



Arabic word for sign or miracle- typically referring to verses of the Koran



Ayat-ul-kursi



One of Koran's long verses



Azan



The call to prayer, five times a day, by the muezzin from the door of a
mosque or a minaret of a large mosque



Babalu



Boogeyman



Bachem



Word meaning "my child" or "my baby 1




Bakhshesh



Forgiveness



Bakhshida



Pardoned (by God)



Balay



Yes



Bas



Enough



Bazarris




Merchants; people or workers from Bazzars



Bia



To take along, conduct, lead, convey, remove, transport (peculiar to
animate objects)



bi-wal



Biryani



Indian rice dish made with meat, vegetables and yogurt



Bismillah



In the name of God! (Frequently used as an ejaculation)




Biwa



Widow



Boboresh



Word meaning "cut him!"



Bolani



Afghan dish consisting of flat bread stuffed with foods such as potatoes or

leeks



Burqa



A women's outer garment that covers them from head to toe, including
the face. Now rarely worn outside of Afghanistan.



Buzkashi



An Afghan national game meaning "goat-pulling" and is played on
horseback by two opposing teams who use the carcass of a calf (a goat was used
in former days) as their object of competition. The purpose is to lift up the




carcass from the center of a circle, carry it around a point some distance away,
and put it again in its original place. All this has to be done on horseback and the
chapandaz, expert player, must try to keep possession of the headless carcass.
Cash prizes are given to the player who scores a goal and to the winning team.



Caracul



A type of sheep



Chai



Tea



Chaman



A town in Afghanistan



Chapan



A traditional coat for men popular among the Turkic population of
northern Afghanistan, but worn also by other Afghans. It is a long, buttonless
caftan with knee-length sleeves which in warm weather is worn open with a
sleeve thrown over a shoulder. In cold weather fur-lined or quilted chapans are




worn, tied around the waist with a cummerbund. It comes in various colors,
often striped, and is fashioned of cotton or silk.



Chapandaz



A "master" horseman in the Buzkashi competition



Chi



"What?"



Chilas



Wedding rings



Chopan kabob



Pieces of lamb chops marinated and broiled on a skewer




Dil



The heart, mind, soul



Dil-roba



Very beautiful. Dil, heart; roba, thief. A heart thief-someone who takes
your breath away



Diniyat



Religion, religious



Dogh



Buttermilk



Dozd



Bandit




Dostet darum



I love you



Ferni



Rice pudding



Ghazal



Love song or poem



Hadia



Gift



Hadj



Pilgrimage to Mecca




Hijab



Veiling



Iftikhar



Honor



Ihtiram



Veneration, honor, reverence, respect



Inshallah



Word meaning "God willing"



Isfand




A wild plant that is burned for its aroma and to ward off misfortune



Jai-namaz



Prayer rug



Jan



Word of endearment; dear (formal). Joon is the informal form of it that
literally means "life."



Jaroo



Broomstick



Kaka



Uncle




Kamyab



Unique, rare



Kasseef



Filthy, very dirty



Khala



Maternal aunt (Ameh is a paternal aunt.) Calling an unrelated woman
khala indicates that she is very close to the family or to the child.



Khan



Title of tribal chiefs, landed proprietors, and heads of communities .

Unlimited reading from over 1 million ebooks FREE






TOP SERIES
CATEGORIES

RULES
DMCA Notice
Terms of Services
Privacy Policy
DMCA.com Protection Status